Sizing Garments

Each garment has the actual garment dimensions listed out in the size selection boxes along with a diagram showing how these dimensions are measured. These dimensions are the actual size of the cut fabric for each size of the garment, not body dimensions. Due to variable factors in the build process, these numbers can vary slightly. Note that items with loft like down sweater not only require some room in the girth of a size for that loft, but also may require some extra length to accommodate the chamber expansion taking up some length. With lofty garments it makes sense to size them large enough to never place any tension on the shell through movement, but not any larger. Tension on the shells will flatten the loft and reduce the insulation’s warmth.

Please note that the stock size dimensions are merely a suggestion and/or starting point. Custom sizing is available for each product.

The process of getting the correct size for your body, the fit you want, and the layers you wish to accommodate starts with taking your body measurements. These measurements are shown in the diagram and explained out here. They are very easy to take in about 5 minutes for one person. The next step is to read through this page to establish how much room you need to add over your body dimensions to get the right fit for that garments. The last step is to take those numbers and see if there is a stock size that matches these exactly or close enough. If so, great! If not, you’ll want to take advantage of the custom sizing box. Here you can write in amendments to stock sizes or write in a completely custom set of dimensions.

Since each product is built by hand, made-to-order, we typically cannot take size based returns. Due to this, we make every effort to explain, in detail, every dimension and also offer full customization. Please measure yourself, measure other garments, and make appropriate estimations. If you have any questions on selecting a size, please email and I will do my best to help you figure it out. Post sale tailoring and modification is available at an hourly labor rate. Keep in mind it’s usually easier to remove length and girth than to add it.

 

Shoulders – This is the circumference around both shoulders at arm pit height or the widest point. Down and synthetic insulated garments with loft and garments built out of fabrics without stretch generally need about 5″ of extra room here over the wearer’s body dimensions. Garments built from stretchy fabrics can be sized closer to body dimensions.

Torso – This is simply the length of the front from the collar down to the bottom hem. Keep in mind that down items will often take up an inch or two of length with loft.

Back – This is simply the length of the back from the collar down to the bottom hem. Keep in mind that down items will often take up an inch or two of length with loft.

Chest – This is the circumference around the chest at arm pit height or the widest point. Down and synthetic insulated garments with loft and garments built out of fabrics without stretch generally need 5 to 10″ of extra room here over the wearer’s body dimensions. Garments built from stretchy fabrics also need some room but it can be closer to body dimensions.

Midsection – This is the circumference around the body halfway between the chest and the hips (bottom hem). Down and synthetic insulated garments with loft and garments built out of fabrics without stretch generally need 5 to 10″ of extra room here over the wearer’s body dimensions. Garments built from stretchy fabrics also need some room but it can be closer to body dimensions. If it is a pullover, then this has to be large enough to pull it on over the shoulders. 5″ less than your shoulder circumference is usually the minimum you can get away with and still be able to pull over.

Hips – This is the circumference around the bottom of the garment where it sits on the wearer’s hips. Note that a garment typically sits down on the hips, not the waist and the appropriate measurement is around the widest part of the hips. If the garment has a closure mechanism like a full zipper, then this dimension can be sized just a few inches larger than the hip measurement. If it is a pullover, then the bottom has to be large enough to pull it on over the shoulders. 5″ less than your shoulder circumference is usually the minimum you can get away with and still be able to pull over.

Arm – This is the length from the AC joint, or the outside of the shoulder down to the end of the sleeve. Make it as long as needed for your use. Keep in mind that down items will often take up an inch or two of length with loft.

Arm Hole – This is the circumference around the attachment point of the sleeve, which is from the AC joint, down under the arm pit, and up the backside to the AC joint.

Bicep – This is the circumference around the sleeve midway between the elbow and the connection to the body. Down and synthetic insulated garments with loft and garments built out of fabrics without stretch generally need 5 to 10″ of extra room here over the wearer’s body dimensions. Garments built from stretchy fabrics also need some room but it can be closer to body dimensions.

Neck – This is the circumference around the connection point of the collar or hood. Garments with closure mechanisms like full zippers and partial zippers are typically sized smaller than the head circumference. Garments that have no closure mechanism around the neck must be sized large enough for the head to pass through.